New Deadlines:

Public (sort of) declaration of self-imposed deadlines:

September 8: 50,000 words

October 5: First draft complete

January 15: Second draft complete

 

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The Determinism Apparent in a Series of Unfortunate Events … Or In Spite of.

Dear Reader,

It’s important to be forgiving. It’s important to love the writing process. It’s important to understand this THING … this NOVEL in PROGRESS … is the journey I seek.

It’s also important to realize that writing can be frustrating as fuck.

On Monday, my 50,000 word, self-imposed deadline is about to go whooshing past. Quite frankly with prep for my fall classes and grading and …  well, I’m not going to make the deadline.

I could choose:

A. Screaming at my cursed existence.

B. Screaming, crying, AND cursing.

C. Blaming my cat. Again.*

D. Forgiving myself and getting back to work.

Obviously D. Always D.

I could tell you why this missed writing goal isn’t my fault. See *. But who cares? I need to plow through. Because I have goals. Real goals. I want to start my own writing business. I want my novel published. I want … phew, I’m a Buddhist nightmare.

But whatever. I want. I’m writing.

Now back to work. IN SPITE OF.

 

 

*My cat is the loveliest lemon you’d ever have the privilege of snuggling with if you were lucky enough to meet him.

On my way to work this morning …

I saw a rabbit scampering across the campus lawn, a stripe of white down its side like a lightning bolt.

Still alive. Still here. Still breathing.

Today marks twenty days of … something. I don’t even know what. Poor health, for sure. Something brought on by a virus that morphed my usual autoimmune symptoms into something new, something I’m working my way through.

But I’m getting better.

 

deep breath

the morning dew

glistens

The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up

Tidying Up Book.jpgClutter is a part of my life. Always has been, probably always will be. I tend to rationalize it, as in I tell myself I’m smart enough not to waste time on unnecessary cleaning. And there is some science to back me up on this. See article here: https://curiousmindmagazine.com/science-says-highly-intelligent-people-messy-profane-night-owls/

So it’s funny that I’ve been wanting to read Marie Kondo’s THE LIFE-CHANGING MAGIC OF TIDYING UP since I first heard of it some years back. Fast forward to about a month ago, I happened to remember the book while searching for a different book at the public library. I put my name on the wait list, and it arrived the other day. (Side note: It’s impressive that there is still a wait list for this book more than two years after publication.)

Books have a way of entering your life at the right time, and Kondo’s is no exception. Lately, I’ve been telling myself I need to get ready for a move, even though I have no idea when or how that will be. I haven’t really wanted to leave Albuquerque. I love the area. The great food, the Sandia Mountains to the east, the volcanoes to the west. It’s just beautiful here. But I need a better job. And I haven’t been making much progress on sending out my memoir. Albuquerque’s been feeling less like home.

Kondo’s method involves chucking anything you own that doesn’t “spark joy.” When I started sorting my clothes first like she recommends, I didn’t think I’d have much to get rid of, and in the scheme of things, I didn’t—certainly not trash bags full like some of her clients. But I did find clothes that I’d force myself to wear in spite of feeling frumpy and old in them. She’s right. Trashing these materials is actually freeing. It’s like a tamer form of Chuck Palahniuk’s blow-up-your-apartment-and-leave method. It feels better to wear something you like and are comfortable in, even if it means wearing the same outfit frequently. While I can’t get rid of every piece of clothing that doesn’t spark joy, a certain income is required for that, I’m more conscious of the clothes I still have.

Over these last days, I’ve been culling more and more stuff, and it’s sorta addicting. Like, what can I get rid of next?!? But then this morning, I noticed a calendar I hung above my writing desk and stopped. My dad’s calendar. It’s one of those free calendars you get in the mail from the Nature Conservancy. I took it from his desk a couple of nights before his funeral. I wanted something of his to hold onto, I told myself, but I think now I was literally trying to stop time. When I hung it up in my apartment, I declared I wouldn’t take it down until I moved out of the city. That’s a lot of mental baggage to hang on yourself, and I realized it needed to go.

But I couldn’t do it.

So I stared at it throughout the day, giving it the beady eye. When I finally took it down this evening, I could feel the frown on my face as I held it. The constriction in my chest. And I missed my father again. I placed it on a chair next to the trash first, and then finally in the trash. Time has moved on. And so must I.

The whole point of this discarding extravaganza is that by ridding yourself of things that don’t make you happy or “spark joy”  you bring about the things you really do want. Hm. An actual writing career? A better paying job? Kondo’s got her work cut out for her. Or, really, I do since she never actually does the sorting for her clients.

Next up on my discard pile: Socks. I have about 30 mismatched pairs. Time to rectify that.

 

 

On Deserving the Purple Chair

I have a new purple chair, which is really an old purple chair, a hand-me-down from a neighbor. She tells me the chair is from a hotel in town, though she doesn’t know which one. It’s a swayback (I think) with those long unfurling arms, and it is incredibly comfortable. The neighbor just says, “Good lumbar support.” I’d agree.

Here’s a picture. I cropped it as close as possible—my apartment is in a STATE right now. As you can probably see, the chair is worn. A lot of tushes have sat in that seat, I’d bet, if what my neighbor said is true.Purple Chair (1)

About fifty eclectic people call my apartment complex home. We’re joined together by a landlord who generally picks tenants who are quiet and stable. A good thing. There are college students, the middle-aged, lots of single hermetic types, (myself?!) and a few older, closer-to-retired-than-not folks. It’s a quiet place, rare for Albuquerque, and even rarer for complexes in general. On the whole, it’s been a good place to live these last four years, though I find myself wanting to leave now for the first time since I moved here. But that’s another post.

A fair number of people in the complex know who I am, and I tend to get a lot of offers for furniture castoffs from neighbors who are moving or redecorating, including the table I’m writing on. (Which is originally from Neil Patrick Harris’s family restaurant in New Mexico before it closed. Provenance!) Sometimes these offers are great, like the chair and table. Other times they’re annoying. When I’ve been offered clearly used mattresses and frames, broken down TVs, electronic gadgets that don’t work, I think, really? What universe made you think I’d dispose of your trash for you?

But my neighbors really know me for my cat, Vincent. Vinny Walking (1)

Vincent and I stroll the neighborhood, aka, the apartment complex courtyard, together most days. Vinny has had a lot of health problems, which my neighbors ask about. He’s in renal failure and we do subq fluids twice a day. When he doesn’t show up in the courtyard for a few days in a row, people worry, ask if he’s all right. And that’s nice. Vinny likes it too.

The thing is: My cat loves people. He has the brain of a cat, but the heart of a dog, and he always tries to walk with whomever comes and goes. When someone ignores him, I admit it, I judge. There’s one guy who always pays Vinny all sorts of attention when his girlfriend is around and then whizzes on past when he’s without her, breaking my little guy’s heart.

At any rate, because people often think of me when moving, I have quite a mismatch of furniture that fits my lifestyle right now. In addition to the chair and table, I have a cornflower blue loveseat with white snowflakes, and a weird 1975 vinyl chair and table set. (Want it? I hope to sell it. It was made by Madison Industries in Kansas, MS. The same place that made Kirk’s captain chair all those years ago.)

And though I am seated on the purple chair as I type this post, the chair is already more Vinny’s than mine. He often jumps up while I’m trying to read and worms behind me, effectively pushing me off.

He looks like this afterwards:purple chair cat.jpg

But I don’t mind. I think to love a cat is to love that part of its personality that owns you. That owns the chair. That owns the simple love of a good life, and an expectation that the good stuff should be yours. A cat knows to deserve the purple chair.

 

 

 

 

 

Bolaño on other evenings

LEOEGetting caught up on reading this week. According to Goodreads’ book counter, I’m six books behind in my goal of 100 books for the year. Gulp. (Go here if you want to see what I’ve read so far.) But I’ve finished the semester’s grading, so …

In my search for WHAT TO READ, I stumbled upon Roberto Bolaño’s short story collection: Last Evenings on Earth. (Such a good title, eh? I got the book from a fellow MFAer two years ago, stuffed it in my bookshelf, and let it grow a healthy layer of dust until now.)

What I like about the book? Much. Each story hooks you with a nose ring, leads you around for a while, and then mashes your face into the ending/nonending. HA, you thought the story would do THIS?!?

The experience is much more pleasing than it sounds.

Also: It’s interesting to see a writer’s obsessions developing. Many of the same ideas in these short stories are carried through to his magnum opus 2666: murders, movies, Santa Teresa, Sonora, unhappy writers, etc., etc.

But what I really like about the book right now? The down-on-your-luck artists/characters. They live with mothers and sisters, they sell drugs, they work odd jobs, they live poorly. As a fellow inhabitant of not-enough-funds, the characters are satisfying an itch to see other writers/artists NOT making it.

Schadenfreude, you are an unsightly beast.

(The artist shrugs. Takes another careful sip of her coffee—there isn’t much left in the pot.)

Of course Bolaño was incredibly successful. So I wonder if these explorations of less than successful artists really were explorations of his own fears of mediocrity and failure. I wouldn’t be surprised.

The Third Draft–motivation in an unlikely source

I finally started the third draft of my memoir, The Warmth of a Winter Sun. I planned to work on it all winter break, but I couldn’t get motivated. I didn’t want to think about my father anymore. I’ve moved on since his suicide, and I believe writing the first drafts played a large role in that.

Then BAM: the start of the spring semester and the Drump inauguration. The holy shitshow that has been the first days of his administration. And, suddenly, I don’t want to stop working on my memoir. I’ve been putting in 7 and 8 hour editing days when I can.

Why? Plain ol’ insecurity. As an adjunct and single person, I’m constantly walking the money-fence, never knowing if I’m going to have enough cash to pay my bills each month. It’s a frightening place to be some days. The start of the Drump administration has only ratcheted my fears. I can’t help but think: If I can get this book done and published, maybe, just maybe, my job prospects will improve.

(Did I emphasize maybe enough? I realize all the seemingly insurmountable odds in that statement.)

As for the writing: It appears this round is about cutting. The second draft bloated to 295 pages, and I’m down to 277. I like the cuts I’ve made. I had a few moments of angst over some lost passages, but right now I feel like this draft is a lot more focused.

I’d like to get some beta readers after the third draft, but I don’t know if that will actually happen. People are busy. Either way, I’m thinking one more draft at the end of the semester and then I might try and send this thing out.